Relationships, Sexual Health and Parenthood

Citizenship

Human Rights

Racism

Refugees

Domestic Abuse

Sexual Health and Parenthood (taught by the Religious Education department)

 

Citizenship

• Citizens are members of a state or a nation. Citizenship is the process of being such a member. It is how we make society work, together. The European Commission says active citizenship is:


“Participation in civil society, community and/or political life, characterised by mutual respect and non-violence and in accordance with human rights and democracy”


•  So let's make this a reality. Let's help people become effective citizens. The cost is much greater if we don't.

• Society belongs to all of us. What we put into it creates what we get out of it. This helps make it fairer and more inclusive. It supports a democracy in which people participate and belong.

• But it means we all need enough knowledge, skills and confidence to take part effectively.

• Citizenship is directly linked to the growth mindset and how we can all drive effective change.

Digital Citizenship

• In the technological world we now live in, we have become increasingly dependent on the internet. Digital citizenship focuses on using technology safely and responsibly in a positive way. This requires you to think about the impact of your digital activity on the health and wellbeing of others.

•  Being a good digital citizen means to demonstrate and practice safe, responsible and legal use of technology.

Remember: what you write online isn’t written in pencil and it is not as simple as deleting your last post. Everything that happens on the internet can be viewed by a vast, invisible and often anonymous audience. Everything leaves a digital footprint.

Click HERE to download Citizenship Lesson 1

 

Human Rights

Human Rights are the basic rights and freedoms to which all human beings are entitled, like civil and political rights, the right to life and liberty, freedom of thought and speech/expression, equality before the law, social, cultural and economic rights, the right to food, the right to work, and the right to education. In short, human rights are freedoms established by custom or international agreement that protect the interests of humans and the conduct of governments in every nation.
• Modern human rights were developed after WWII when many people’s rights were violated. On a large scale, these human rights abuses are known as war crimes.
• As a result the United Nations was formed to provide a place for nations to resolve conflicts peacefully. The United Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), consisting of 30 articles describing the basic rights of every person, was signed in 1948 by the 48 countries of the UN.
• It is not legally binding, but its content has been incorporated into the laws of many countries and it has become a standard measure of human rights across the world. In 1998, Britain passed the Human Rights Act incorporating these rights into UK law.
In 1998, the European Union decided to update the list of human rights to take account of changes in society and technology. The result was the European Charter of Fundamental Rights in 2000 which included new human rights such as:
• The right to a private life, including the right to privacy and confidentiality of letters and emails;
• The right to respect the integrity of human beings, including a ban on financial gain from the human body, such as the sale of human organs and the cloning of human beings;
• The right to data protection;
• The right to limits on working hours and annual paid holidays.

 

We are all entitled to freedom, equality, freedom from discrimination, freedom from slavery, freedom from torture, treated equally in the law, equal protection from the law, the right to select government, the right to security, the right to work and workers rights, to be responsible to your to your community, to a fair trail, the right to privacy, nationality and to move within your own country and claim asylum in others, the right to own property, have religious freedom and freedom of speech.

 

Show Racism the Red Card

Click on the graphic bellow for more information on our Show Racism the Red Card project.

Racism Lesson 1

Racism Lesson 2

Racism Lesson 3

Show Racism the Red Card Teacher/Parent Guide

 
red-card-logo_large1.jpg
 

Racism is the belief that people who have a different skin colour, nationality, religion or culture are inferior. Racist ideas have developed over thousands of years and have been used to justify the oppression of many different groups of people.

What is Racism?

Racism can take many forms, ranging from verbal abuse to outright physical attacks to a person or property. Racism can also be non-verbal, for example denying a person from a minority ethnic background a job or entry to a restaurant or shop, purely on the grounds of their colour, nationality or religion.

How does racism manifest itself?

A public authority must, in the exercise of its functions, have due regard to the need to:

(a) Eliminate discrimination, harassment, victimisation and any other conduct that is prohibited by or under this Act.

(b) Advance equality of opportunity between persons who share a relevant protected characteristic and persons who do not share it.

(c) Foster good relations between persons who share a relevant protected characteristic and persons who do not share it.

There are 9 protected characteristics: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. 

2010 Equality Act

 

Forms of racism have been around since the start of history. Prejudice and bad treatment of particular groups of people are widespread in British history and unfortunately, this is probably found in every society of the world today. Ever since people started to travel to different places and meet other groups, there has been conflict as people fought over power, land and money. People often believe that their culture, country and group is better than others’ and use this as an excuse to justify treating other people badly. However, racism in the form that we know it today, where people are divided by the colour of their skin has not always been around. This can be traced back to the transatlantic slave trade where millions of Africans were enslaved by Western countries.

When did racism start?

• Slavery did not vanish overnight. Many people still hold racist views which have their origins in such beliefs and views around birth-rights and citizenship.
• The abolition of the Slave Trade did not equate with equal rights as we will see in the next section.
• More than 29 million people in the world live in slavery today.
•Mauritania (Africa) only outlawed slavery in 1981 though it is estimated that 20% of its population are still enslaved.
• Countries with the most slaves today include India (14.3 million estimate slaves), China (3.2 million estimated slaves) and Pakistan (2.1 million estimated slaves).

If slavery was abolished in 1807, why is the Slave Trade still relevant today?

Jim Crow Laws were a set of laws in the United States created in 1876 after the abolition of slavery. The laws segregated everything in the Southern states of America so there were separate schools, transport, restaurants and shops for black and white people and the facilities for black people were much worse.  Fighting against this injustice was often met with murder, lynching and riots.

 In 1963 civil rights groups organised the March on Washington, which was attended by over 200,000 people and provided the platform for Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech. The government was forced to act and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 formally ended the system of Jim Crow and banned segregation and discrimination. Despite the ban, there was a lot of resistance to the act and black people still faced a great deal of discrimination and inequality. New groups such as the Black Power movement emerged to continue the battle for full civil rights.

The Jim Crow Laws

 
 

The Refugee Crisis

• There are an estimated 60 million people throughout the world  who have been forced to flee their homes.

• The numbers of protracted conflicts have increased. This has created more than 15 million refugees worldwide - but developing countries host over 80 per cent of people.

• There are an estimated 117,234 refugees living in the UK. That's just 0.18 per cent of the total population (64.1 million people).

The Refugee Crisis Lesson 1

The Refugee Crisis Lesson 2

The Refugee Crisis Lesson 3

 

What is the difference between a refugee and an asylum seeker?

Refugees: The UN Convention on the Status of Refugees (1951) – the Geneva Convention – defines refugees as people who seek asylum (safety) in another country and have a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of their race, religion, nationality, political opinion or their membership of a particular social group, which prevents them from returning to their home country.

Asylum seeker: Someone who is seeking a place of safety in another country, who has applied for protection as a refugee and is waiting for the authorities to decide their status. Asylum seekers become accepted as refugees if the authorities in the receiving country decide their claim is valid and fits the international definition of a refugee.

The UK received just 38,878 asylum applications (including dependents). This was less than Germany (431,000), Sweden (163,000), and Hungary (163,000). Just 45 per cent of cases were granted asylum and allowed to stay once their cases had been fully concluded. Many are initially refused because it is difficult to provide the evidence needed to meet the strict criteria of a refugee. 

How did the refugee crisis happen?

Syria’s civil war has created the worst humanitarian crisis of our time. Half the country’s pre-war population — more than 11 million people — have been killed or forced to flee their homes. Families are struggling to survive inside Syria, or make a new home in neighbouring countries. Others are risking their lives on the way to Europe, hoping to find acceptance and opportunity. And harsh winters and hot summers make life as a refugee even more difficult. At times, the effects of the conflict can seem overwhelming.

The Syrian Crisis

The situation in Syria went from bad to worse when outside parties began launching airstrikes in the fall of 2015. Each time bombing intensifies, there is an increase in the number of civilian casualties and families forced to leave their homes in search of safety. In December 2016, fighting in Aleppo City intensified and East Aleppo, the final stronghold within the city, fell. People were forced to evacuate the city. 
More than half of the world's refugees (60 per cent) came from just five countries: Syria: 4.2 million; Afghanistan: 2.6 million; Somalia: 1.1 million; Sudan: 744,000; South Sudan: 641,000

 
 

How has Europe Responded?

• Tensions in the EU have been rising because of the disproportionate burden faced by some countries, particularly the countries where the majority of migrants have been arriving: Greece, Italy and Hungary. EU ministers voted by a majority to relocate 160,000 refugees EU-wide.
• The UK has opted out of any plans for a quota system but, according to Home Office figures, 1,000 Syrian refugees were resettled under the Vulnerable Persons Relocation scheme in 2015. Current Prime Minister Theresa May has argued that it is better to help more refugees in their own region than resettle a smaller number, and said the UK was the second biggest humanitarian donor to camps in the countries around Syria.

How many asylum claims are approved?

• Although huge numbers have been applying for asylum, the number of people being given asylum is far lower.

• In 2015, EU countries offered asylum to 292,540 refugees. In the same year, more than a million migrants applied for asylum - although applying for asylum can be a lengthy procedure so many of those given refugee status may have applied in previous years.

EU Recommendations

The European Union and Member States should:
• Continue support for search and rescue missions in the southern Mediterranean, especially in Greece.
• Establish a rapid emergency response mechanism that is able to deal with this recurrent crisis.
• Increase safe legal routes to and through Europe for refugees.
• Fulfil commitments to relocate 160, 000 asylum-seekers from EU border countries and understand countries should expect to be prepared to cope with far greater numbers of arrivals.
•Address the reasons why people are fleeing to Europe, such as solving conflict.

 

Domestic Abuse

Domestic abuse is the abuse of a partner or an ex-partner (usually female). There are different types of abuse that women can experience in relationships. Abuse can be:

Physical: Hitting or punching someone, grabbing someone’s arm.

Psychological: Making comments about their partner’s physical appearance, telling their partner how to act. Isolating their partner from their friends, taking their phone away, answering for their.

Sexual: Inappropriate comments on details relating to one’s appearance or sexuality.  Forcing their partner to do things that they do not want to do. Rape.

Spiritual or Emotional: Using someone’s faith and beliefs against their partner. Twisting the truth of their beliefs.

Financial: Controlling their partner’s finances, limited their freedom and choices. Theft.

Domestic abuse can also happen in teenage relationships. Healthy relationships exist when there is respect and an equal sharing of power between the couple.

CARA (Challenging and Responding to Abuse): 0141 418 0748

Young Person’s Counsellor: 01389 738 680

Childline: 0800 1111

Clydebank  Women’s Aid: 0141 952 8118

Dumbarton Women’s Aid: 01389 751036

Scottish Domestic Abuse Helpline: 0800 027 1234

Breathing Space: 0800 838 587

Rape Crisis: 0141  552 3200

 
 

Domestic Abuse Organisations and Helplines

CARA (Challenging and Responding to Abuse): 0141 418 0748

Young Person’s Counsellor: 01389 738 680

Childline: 0800 1111

Clydebank  Women’s Aid: 0141 952 8118

Dumbarton Women’s Aid: 01389 751036

Scottish Domestic Abuse Helpline: 0800 027 1234

Breathing Space: 0800 838 587

Rape Crisis: 0141  552 3200

 

Domestic Abuse

 

Why does domestic abuse happen?

Commonly held beliefs about the causes of domestic abuse: unemployment, depression, stress, alcohol or drug use, part of a certain culture, their father was abusive to their mother and/or they had a bad childhood, because the woman won’t stop nagging, jealousy and/or because the woman was unfaithful.

Actual causes of domestic abuse: Wanting to control your partner, believing you have a right to be abusive to a partner in order to gain control, having no respect for your partner, wanting to be the boss in the house, abusing power in a relationship.

Remember: There are NEVER ANY EXCUSES for domestic abuse.

Why does domestic abuse happen?

Commonly held beliefs about the causes of domestic abuse: unemployment, depression, stress, alcohol or drug use, part of a certain culture, their father was abusive to their mother and/or they had a bad childhood, because the woman won’t stop nagging, jealousy and/or because the woman was unfaithful.
Actual causes of domestic abuse: Wanting to control your partner, believing you have a right to be abusive to a partner in order to gain control, having no respect for your partner, wanting to be the boss in the house, abusing power in a relationship.
Remember: There are NEVER ANY EXCUSES for domestic abuse.

Common behaviours of someone who is being abused

Denying It: Claiming that they fell down the stairs or into a door.
Blaming someone else: They wouldn’t have been abused if their family had not got involved. They didn’t like what their friend said to them and blame them for gossiping about them behind their back.
Blaming something else: It was because the perpetrator of abuse was drunk. The perpetrator of abuse was forced to change their partner’s behaviour to protect them.
Minimising it: Trivialising psychological abuse. Having their abuser tell them they are free to go knowing that they have control over them (financial, psychological or emotional).
Genuinely acceptable reasons: NEVER
THERE ARE NO EXCUSES FOR DOMESTIC ABUSE People choose to be abusive in their relationships. Lots of people who have problems don’t abuse their partners. If you are unhappy with your partner do you have the right to abuse them? NO!

St Peter the Apostle High School, 
Kirkoswald Drive,
Clydebank,
G81 2DB

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